An Evaluation of the Knight International Journalism Fellowships

An Evaluation of the Knight International Journalism Fellowships

Running an innovative, high-impact journalism project requires not only journalism expertise but entrepreneurial drive, keen management skills, and buy-in from local partners, a report commissioned by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and the International Center for Journalists finds. According to An Evaluation of the Knight International Journalism Fellowships (51 pages, PDF), the work of twenty-three fellows in Africa, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East between 2007 and 2010 led to more than thirty governmental policy changes or actions in response to news stories; the creation of four educational institutions, twelve networks, and more than ten training materials; and the leveraging of some $8 million in additional funding. What's more, even after the fellowships ended, most of the projects continued to operate. Because mobile phones and the Internet reach more people than traditional media in developing countries, the report also found that projects focused on digital journalism were the most likely to produce lasting impact.