Black Male Student Success in Higher Education: A Report From the National Black Male College Achievement Study

Black Male Student Success in Higher Education: A Report From the National Black Male College Achievement Study

Early support from parents, teachers, and peer mentors is essential for African-American men to aspire toward and succeed in higher education, a report from the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education at the University of Pennsylvania finds. Based on interviews with male African-American student leaders on forty-two college campuses, Black Male Student Success in Higher Education: A Report From the National Black Male College Achievement Study (32 pages, PDF) found that their parents — many of whom had no college degree — reinforced their college aspirations from early childhood, seeking out tutoring and academic support programs, college preparatory initiatives, and summer academies that enabled their sons to overcome obstacles that often disadvantaged their peers, such as low teacher expectations, insufficient preparation for college courses, and disengagement as a result of underrepresentation. Funded by the Lumina Foundation for Education, National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, American College Personnel Association, National Academic Advising Association, Pennsylvania State University College of Education, Africana Research Center, and Children, Youth, and Families Consortium, the report also found that teachers who invested extra time and effort, bridge programs to ease the transition, financial aid, and older African-American students who shared insights and resources helped them achieve college success.