Bureau of Labor Statistics Volunteer Survey

Bureau of Labor Statistics Volunteer Survey

About 59 million people, or 27.6 percent of Americans over the age of sixteen, volunteered at least once during the twelve-month period that ended in September 2002, according to a new survey released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, a branch of the U.S. Department of Labor. The results (14 pages, HTML) indicate that women volunteer more than men, employed persons are more likely to volunteer than the unemployed or those outside of the labor force, and the volunteer rate for college graduates is four times that of high-school dropouts. In addition, the survey — the first such study on voluntarism since 1989, when President George Bush initiated the Daily Points of Light awards to honor organizations and citizens for their community service work — finds that the median time spent volunteering in a year is fifty-two hours and that most volunteers work for religious or educational/youth-service related causes. The information on volunteering was collected through a supplement to the bureau's monthly employment survey of 60,000 households.