Contextualizing Change in Marital Satisfaction During Middle Age

Contextualizing Change in Marital Satisfaction During Middle Age

A new report from the University of California, Berkeley's Institute of Personality and Social Research shares the findings of a study that followed the marital ups and downs of about a hundred women born in the late 1930s through early marriage, child-rearing, and, in many cases, divorce, remarriage, and/or domestic partnerships. Funded by the Retirement Research Foundation and the Metanexus Institute, the report, Contextualizing Change in Marital Satisfaction During Middle Age, found that, overall, participants' marriages improved after their children left the home because of the quality of time they were then able to spend with their spouses. However, respondents did not note an increase in their general sense of life fulfillment, suggesting that post-empty-nest improvements are specific to marital relationships.