Crafting Lives That Work: A Six-Year Retrospective on Reduced-Load Work in the Careers and Lives of Professionals and Managers

Crafting Lives That Work: A Six-Year Retrospective on Reduced-Load Work in the Careers and Lives of Professionals and Managers

A joint study by Michigan State and McGill universities, Crafting Lives That Work: A Six-Year Retrospective on Reduced-Load Work in the Careers and Lives of Professionals and Managers (24 pages, PDF), found that professionals and managers who work three or four days a week instead of five can still keep their careers on track, see their salaries grow, and experience their personal lives more fully; and companies that allow employees to work fewer than forty hours per week can still retain top-level talent. Originally, eighty-seven respondents working reduced hours in a variety of industries participated in interviews between 1996 and 1998; of the 91 percent who took part in follow-up interviews in 2002 and 2003, nearly half were still working reduced-load schedules, and those who had begun to work full-time said they would prefer to work less. The study was funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.