'Evaluation of the Teacher Incentive Fund: Implementation and Early Impacts of Pay-for-Performance After One Year'

'Evaluation of the Teacher Incentive Fund: Implementation and Early Impacts of Pay-for-Performance After One Year'

Criteria and requirements for the Teacher Incentive Fund, which Congress established in 2006 to support performance-based compensation systems for teachers and principals in high-need schools, have not been fully or consistently implemented, a report from Mathematica Policy Research finds. The report, Evaluation of the Teacher Incentive Fund: Implementation and Early Impacts of Pay-for-Performance After One Year (22 pages, PDF), found that only 46 percent of the districts that received TIF grants had implemented all required components, which include measures of teacher effectiveness, bonuses based on such measures, opportunities for educators to take on additional responsibilities for more pay, and professional development. The report also found that districts expected to award bonuses to more than 90 percent of their teachers and principals, suggesting the award criteria were not consistent with TIF guidance for pay-for-performance bonuses. Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the Institute of Education Sciences, and the National Center for Education Evaluation, the report also notes that many teachers indicated that different criteria were used to evaluate their performance, lower bonuses were given than those reported by districts, and fewer teachers in high-need schools that offered bonuses were satisfied with opportunities for professional advancement and school morale.

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