Healthy Parks, Schools and Communities

Healthy Parks, Schools and Communities

Communities of color and low-income families tend to be "park poor," with limited access to safe green spaces and the physical, psychological, cultural, social, environmental, and economic benefits they offer, a study by the City Project finds. The report, Healthy Parks, Schools and Communities: Green Access and Equity for Orange County (24 pages, PDF), maps population, median household income, and child obesity rates against the distribution of green spaces across Orange County and finds that areas with the least parkland per thousand people are also where poorer communities of color live. Racial and ethnic disparities in access to safe parks are a legacy of a history of discriminatory land use and economic policies and practices, the authors argue, and equitable green access is an issue of equal justice. Part of an effort to map nine Southern California counties' parks and green spaces, the report was funded by the Kresge, Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert, Marguerite Casey, John Randolph Haynes and Dora Haynes, Rouben and Violet Jiji, San Diego, Union Bank of California, William C. Kenney Watershed Protection, and Whole Systems foundations; the California Endowment; and Kaiser Permanente.