Media, Charity, and Philanthropy in the Aftermath of September 11, 2001

Media, Charity, and Philanthropy in the Aftermath of September 11, 2001

The American public responded to the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon with an immediate and unprecedented outpouring of dollars for the victims of the attacks, both direct and indirect. Yet, fueled by sensationalistic reporting, the insistent demands of a twenty-four news cycle, and missteps by the American Red Cross and others, questions soon arose about the distribution of those funds. What really happened? In Media, Charity, and Philanthropy in the Aftermath of September 11, 2001 (124 pages, PDF), Paula DiPerna, a former president of the Joyce Foundation and a member of the Century Foundation's Project on Homeland Security, uses three cases studies — the American Red Cross, the September 11th Fund, and Disaster Relief Medicaid — to show how foundations and the media were unable to convey an accurate picture of the role and activities of philanthropic organizations in the wake of September 11 and offers a number of recommendations for strengthening and improving communication by the nonprofit sector in the post-9/11 era.