Now That I'm Here: What America's Immigrants Have to Say about Life in the U.S. Today

Now That I'm Here: What America's Immigrants Have to Say about Life in the U.S. Today

A new survey from Public Agenda, a New York City-based nonprofit public opinion research and citizen education organization, explores the views of the nation's immigrants at a time when the American public appears to be rethinking the country's openness to foreign-born residents. Prepared for the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Now That I'm Here: What America's Immigrants Have to Say About Life in the U.S. Today (68 pages, PDF) captures the opinions of more than 1,000 immigrants on a range of issues, including making a living, the pressure to learn English, and the post-September 11 environment. According to the report, while nearly 90 percent of those surveyed believe the U.S. offers more opportunity to earn a good living than their own country, more than 60 percent believe there is some anti-immigrant discrimination in the society. A majority also expressed a favorable view of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, although roughly the same percentage voiced frustration with the INS bureaucracy. Overall, the survey reveals that 80 percent of respondents would still emigrate to the U.S. if they had to make the choice again.