Racial-Ethnic Inequality in Child Well-Being From 1985-2004: Gaps Narrowing, But Persist

Racial-Ethnic Inequality in Child Well-Being From 1985-2004: Gaps Narrowing, But Persist

Since 1985, racial and ethnic inequalities in child well-being among African-American, Hispanic, and white children have narrowed overall, a new policy brief from the Foundation for Child Development finds. The brief, Racial-Ethnic Inequality in Child Well-Being From 1985-2004: Gaps Narrowing, But Persist (15 pages, PDF), finds that gaps in family economic well-being narrowed for both African-American and Hispanic children as parental employment and health insurance coverage increased. Children also benefited from advances in the safety-behavioral domains, including reductions in cigarette smoking and alcohol and illicit drug use. Even if African-American and Hispanic children reach parity with white children, however, the overall well-being of all three groups will remain substantially below the best that the United States has ever achieved on these measures.