Stand by Me: What Teachers Really Think about Unions, Merit Pay and Other Professional Matters

Stand by Me: What Teachers Really Think about Unions, Merit Pay and Other Professional Matters

According to a new survey from nonprofit opinion research organization Public Agenda, public school teachers say they love their work and are confident in their ability to reach and teach most students. But a majority (59 percent) feel they are unfairly held accountable for raising student achievement when so much that affects learning is beyond their control. Stand by Me: What Teachers Really Think about Unions, Merit Pay and Other Professional Matters exams teachers' views on unions, tenure, pay-for-performance, alternative certification, and other issues and finds that while most teachers are strong supporters of standards, a sense of vulnerability, along with fears of politics and favoritism, make them loyal to the tenure system, loyal to their unions, and highly skeptical about pay tied to student test scores. Funding for Stand by Me was provided by the Broad Foundation, the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and the Sidney J. Weinberg Foundation.