Putting Men's Health Care Disparities On The Map: Examining Racial and Ethnic Disparities at the State Level

Putting Men's Health Care Disparities On The Map: Examining Racial and Ethnic Disparities at the State Level

Although men of color in nearly every state fare worse than white men on most measures of health status, health care, and social determinants of health, every racial/ethnic group faces distinct health challenges, a report from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation finds. Putting Men's Health Care Disparities on the Map: Examining Racial and Ethnic Disparities at the State Level (77 pages, PDF) examined disparities in the health of men by race/ethnicity based on indicators such as rates of diabetes and obesity, insurance coverage, self-reported health status, and unmet needs due to cost, poverty, incarceration, and unemployment. Among other things, the report found that Native Americans had higher rates of health and access challenges than men in other racial and ethnic groups; that more than 40 percent of Latino men lacked insurance, a personal doctor/healthcare provider, or delayed or went without care because of cost; and that black men experienced consistently higher rates of problems associated with social determinants of health than whites.