Putting Women's Health Care Disparities on the Map: Examining Racial and Ethnic Disparities at the State Level

Putting Women's Health Care Disparities on the Map: Examining Racial and Ethnic Disparities at the State Level

A decade after U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher called for the elimination of racial disparities in health, women of color in every state continue to fare worse than white women on a variety of health measures, a new report from the Kaiser Family Foundation finds. The report, Putting Women's Health Care Disparities on the Map: Examining Racial and Ethnic Disparities at the State Level (112 pages, PDF), analyzed twenty-five indicators of health and well-being grouped into three "dimensions" — health status, access and utilization, and social determinants — and found persistent disparities between white women and women of color, with some of the largest evident in rates of new AIDS cases, late or no prenatal care, insurance coverage, and lack of a high school diploma. The report also found that each racial and ethnic group faced its own particular set of health and healthcare challenges, and that the haelth experiences of women often varied considerably by state.