Reparable Harm: Fulfilling the Unkept Promise of Educational Opportunity for California's Long Term English Learners

Reparable Harm: Fulfilling the Unkept Promise of Educational Opportunity for California's Long Term English Learners

According to a new report from Californians Together, systemic issues in California's public education system have resulted in a majority of high school English learners who are not English proficient and have major academic deficits despite many years in the state's schools. Funded by the California Community Foundation, the report, Reparable Harm: Fulfilling the Unkept Promise of Educational Opportunity for California's Long Term English Learners (68 pages, PDF), found that 59 percent of California's high school English learners are long-term English learners — defined as students who spend six or more years in U.S. schools without achieving English proficiency. In some districts, that rate is as high as 75 percent. In response, the report calls on policy makers to collect data and monitor the progress of English learners to prevent an increase in the number of long-term English learners and to provide materials, professional development, program, and curriculum support to help all English learners succeed.