The New Male Mystique

The New Male Mystique

Even as gender roles have evolved and men are increasingly involved in family life, they are more likely than women to experience work-family conflict, a new report from the Families and Work Institute finds. The study, The New Male Mystique (26 pages, PDF), looked at the average number of hours men work, the level of their job demands, work-family balance, and family and parental status, and found that men working fifty hours or more a week and fathers who are part of a dual-earner couple are more likely to report experiencing work-family conflict. Funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the IBM Corporation, the report argues that increasing job demands, blurring boundaries between work and home, declining job security, and flat earnings have made it more difficult for men to live up to the "male mystique." The report also highlight factors that help reduce work-family conflict, including supportive supervisors and co-workers, workplace flexibility, and a workplace culture in which men do not have to choose between career advancement and family.