Terra Foundation for American Art

Terra Foundation for American Art

Mission: To engage individuals around the globe in an enriching dialogue on American art, and to support its hometown, Chicago, as a center for the presentation and study of American art.

Background:
The Terra Foundation for American Art was established in 1978 by businessman and art collector Daniel J. Terra (1911-1996), who became U.S. ambassador-at-large for cultural affairs in 1982, a position created for him by President Reagan. The foundation opened the Terra Museum of American Art in Evanston, Illinois, in 1980, and later moved it to Chicago; in 2003, the board of directors decided to close the museum at the end of October 2004, and then lent about fifty paintings and close to 350 works on paper to the Art Institute of Chicago. The Terra collection includes more than seven hundred paintings, prints, drawings, photographs, and sculptures from the colonial era through 1945, with works by George Bellows, Mary Cassatt, John Singleton Copley, Stuart Davis, Childe Hassam, Robert Henri, Maurice Prendergast, James McNeill Whistler, and Samuel F.B. Morse. Today, the foundation focuses on its international initiatives, building on the programs of its Mus�e d'Art Am�ricain Giverny in France, and on exhibitions in Chicago, but it also makes grants to exhibitions in the United States that encompass multi-national collaboration or interpret American art within a global context.

Outstanding Web Features:
The Terra Foundation's Web site details the expanded grant program, including guidelines for its three grant areas: exhibition, academic and public programs, and Chicago K-12 education; how to apply; and deadlines. It also provides information on the foundation's online art collection; current exhibitions and loans; and education and scholarship initiatives.

President and CEO: Elizabeth Glassman
Main Office:
664 North Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611
Tel: (312) 664 3939
Tel: (312) 664 2052
E-mail: contact@terraamericanart.org
Subjects: arts and culture